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Philosophy

A guide for finding philosophy resources in UVic Libraries.

Primary Sources

A collection of "great" American and English literature as well as Western philosophy, provided free on open access principles.

EEBO contains digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473-1700 - from the first book printed in English by William Caxton, through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare and the tumult of the English Civil War.

Over 180,000 titles, including works published in the UK during the 18th century plus thousands from elsewhere, Books, pamphlets, essays, broadsides and more.  Based on the English Short Title Catalogue. Primarily in English. Full-text searchable. View the digital page images. Save, bookmark, print and download works. Use Research Tools to learn more.

Electronic Enlightenment is the most wide-ranging online collection of edited correspondence of the early modern period, linking people across Europe, the Americas and Asia from the early 17th to the mid-19th century — reconstructing one of the world's great historical “conversations”.

The papers of the author, educator, and political philosopher Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) are one of the principal sources for the study of modern intellectual life. Located in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress, they constitute a large and diverse collection reflecting a complex career. With over 25,000 items (about 75,000 digital images), the papers contain correspondence, articles, lectures, speeches, book manuscripts, transcripts of Adolf Eichmann's trial proceedings, notes, and printed matter pertaining to Arendt's writings and academic career. The entire collection has been digitized and is available to researchers in reading rooms at the Library of Congress, the New School University in New York City, and the Hannah Arendt Center at the University of Oldenburg, Germany. Parts of the collection and the finding aid are available for public access on the Internet.

The Online Library of Liberty is an extensive digital library of scholarly works focused on individual liberty and free markets. From Art and Economics to Law and Political Theory, the OLL provides a curated collection of resources available to download at no charge.

PM includes 171 separate collections, ranging from the works of French philosophers Peter Abelard, Simone de Beauvoir, Michel Foucault, and Nicolas Malebranche to those of British naturalist Charles Darwin; German philosophers Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Friedrich Schiller; Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard; Austrian thinker Ludwig Wittgenstein, and many others, such as British novelist Mary Shelley and Greek philosopher Plato.

Thematic collections feature “Bluestocking Feminism 1738–1785”; “Chawton House Travel Writings, the Emerging Tradition 1500–1700”; “ Pickering Women’s Classics, Silver Fork Novels, and Women Writing Home, 1700–1920,” to name but a few. Material here is in several languages: Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish, among others. Users can set the search language to English, Spanish, French, Dutch, Portuguese, Russian, or Chinese.

Creative Commons License
This work by The University of Victoria Libraries is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License unless otherwise indicated when material has been used from other sources.